1 – Distorting Indian History – S.L. Bhyrappa

Dr. N.S. Rajaram Introductory Note – N.S. Rajaram

In a previous column a comparison was drawn between S.L. Bhyrappa’s controversial Kannada best seller Aavarana and Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code, both of which refer to political distortion of history. Where Brown uses the idea for narrative purposes, it forms the central theme of Bhyrappa’s novel. In the climactic scene of Aavarana that comes towards the end of the novel, the protagonist Lakshmi-Razia boldly confronts government appointed committee of education officials (including the minister who bears resemblance to the late Arjun Singh) denouncing them as cowards and falsifiers of history. It is interesting to note that this is a fictionalised account of Bhyrappa’s own experience a few years earlier. Here is his own account written originally in Kannada (Vijaya Karnataka; Sunday, October 8, 2006.) We are grateful to Sandeep Balakrishna of Seriously Sandeep for the English version.

Background: A year or so before his famous novel Aavarana appeared, its author S.L Bhyrappa had prepared the ground for the controversy that was to follow by noting how the fanatical Tipu Sultan had been glorified as a freedom fighter and tolerant ruler by ‘secular’ writers bent on whitewashing his record. The article was titled: “Nationalism can never be strengthened by projecting historical lies.” This led to discussions in which noted literary personalities, dramatists and hundreds of readers participated enthusiastically. What is given below is Bhyrappa second article written in response to his secular critics like Girish Karnad whom he had earlier criticized for whitewashing fanatics like Tipu Sultan and Tughlaq. Bhyrappa had titled his article: “What would be the fate of the truth if a historian seeks advantages like a fiction author?” Here is Bhyrappa’s article, slightly abridged and edited. 

Dr. S.L. BhyrappaDistorting Indian History – S.L. Bhyrappa

I am grateful to Shri. Girish Karnad, Sumatheendra Nadig, Dr. Chidananda Murthy, Dr. Suryanath Kamath, Dr. S. Shettar, Shathavadhani R. Ganesh and others who responded earnestly to my article under the title ‘Nationalism can never be strengthened by projecting historical lies.” To continue the discussions about Mohammed Bin Tugalak and Tipu Sultan would be just an exercise in extracting more details. What we really need to do is to analyze the present political attitudes in teaching history. In order to do this, let me first present what I learnt of the nature of the prevailing political control through my own experience.

During the year 1969 – 70 the Central Government under Mrs. Indira Gandhi established a committee under the Chairmanship of G. Parthasarathy, a diplomat close to Nehru-Gandhi family. Its task was to integrate the nation through education. At that time I was a reader in Educational Philosophy at NCERT and was selected as one of the five members of the committee. In our first meeting Mr. Parthasarathy, as Chairman of the committee explained the purpose of our committee in typically diplomatic language: “It is our duty not to sow the seeds of thorns in the minds of the growing children which will grow up as barriers to national integration. Such thorns are found mostly in the history courses. Occasionally we can find them in language and social science courses also. We have to weed them out. We have to include only such thoughts that go towards inculcating the concept of national integration firmly in the minds of our children. This committee carries this great responsibility.”

The other four members were nodding respectfully. But I said, “Sir, I am unable to understand your words. Will you please explain with a few illustrations?” The Chairman responded: “Ghazni Mohammed looted the Somnath Temple, Aurangzeb built mosques by demolishing the temples in Kashi and Mathura, he collected jizya — is it possible to build a strong India under the present circumstances by conveying such useless facts? What purpose do they serve, other than generating hatred?”

“But are they not historical truths?” I persisted.

“Plenty of truths are there. Using these truths judiciously is the wise way to teach history,” he retorted. The remaining four members simply nodded their heads saying “Yes, yes.” But I was not prepared to let him off.

“You yourself gave examples of Kashi and Mathura. Even today, lakhs of pilgrims from all corners of the country visit these places every year. They can see for themselves the huge mosques built using the walls, pillars and columns that once belonged to demolished temples. They can also see a recently built cow shed like shack in a corner, behind the mosque, that serves as their temple. All these pilgrims are distressed to witness such awful structures. They describe the plight of their temples to their relatives after they return home. Can this create national integration? You can hide such history in the school texts. But can we hide such facts when these children go on excursions and see the truth for themselves? Researchers have listed more than thirty thousand such ruined temples in India. Can we hide them all?…”

Mr. Parthasarthy interrupted me and asked: “You are a professor of Philosphy. Can you please tell us what is the purpose of history?”

“Nobody can define the purpose of history. We do not know how the things will shape up because of the development of science and technology in the future. Some western thinkers might call it the philosophy of history. But such thoughts are futile. Our discussion here should be — what is the purpose of teaching history? History is seeking out the truths about our past events, learning about ancient human lives by studying the inscriptions, records, literary works, relics, artefacts etc. We should learn also not to commit the same blunders that our predecessors committed. We have to imbibe the noble qualities that they adopted; historical truths help us to learn all these things.”

“What if this search for truth hurts the feelings of the minority? Can we divide society? Can we sow the seeds of poison?” He tried to stop me with these questions.

“Sir, the categorisation on the lines of majority and minority would itself be dividing the society, or at least a step towards dividing the society. This idea of ‘seeds of poison’ is prejudiced. Why should the minority think of Gazni Mohammed and Aurangzeb as their own people and heroes? Mughal kingdom was destroyed by the religious bigotry of Aurangzeb. It was at its height in Akbar’s time because his policy of tolerance led to religious and social harmony. Can’t we teach such lessons to children without offending the historical truths? Before teaching the lessons to be learnt from the history, should we not explain the historical truths? This idea of hiding true history is driven politics. This trend will not last long. Whether they are minority or majority, if the education does not impart the character to face the truth with emotional maturity, such education is meaningless and also dangerous.” I replied.

Parthasarathy agreed. He said he appreciated my scholarship and the ability to think clearly. During the lunch break he called me aside, indicated his closeness to me by placing his hand on my shoulders. He then said with a winning smile: “What you say is correct academically. You go and write an article about what you said. But when the government formulates a policy covering the whole nation, it has to consider the interests of all the people. Intellectually pure principles do not serve any purpose.”

Next day when we met, I struck to my stand. I argued that history that is not based on truth is futile and dangerous. I did not budge even when Parthasarathy showed his irritation on his face. The morning session closed without arriving at any conclusion. Parthasarathy did not speak to me again. We met again after a fortnight. The committee had been re-structured, without me. In my place was a lecturer in history by name Arjun Dev known for his leftist leanings. The revised text books of science and social studies published by NCERT and the new lessons that were introduced in these texts were written under his guidance. These are the books which were prescribed as texts in the Congress and Communist ruled states or they guided the text-book writers in these States.

Later, I (Bhyrappa) commented on this in a speech I gave at Alwas Nudisiri, in October 2005:

Prof. R.S. SharmaProf. Satish ChandraIn the NCERT books for XI standard, the Ancient India part is written by the Marxist historian R.S. Sharma and the Medieval India part is by Satish Chandra, also a Marxist. When examined, one can observe that how members belonging to this group had a scheme to brainwash the minds of growing children. According to them Ashoka preached to respect even (stress is mine) Brahmins by advocating the quality of tolerance. He had banned the ritual of sacrificing the animals and birds. When the performance of yagnas was stopped due to this ban, Brahmins lost their share of dakshina (cash gifts) and their livelihood was affected. The Maurya empire disintegrated after Ashoka and many parts of this kingdom came under the rule of Brahmins.

How childish can one be — to claim that a highly influential religion that had spread all over India and even beyond declined because dissatisfied Brahmins were deprived of their dakshina (cash gifts)? Their other claim is that Muslims demolished temples to loot the riches and wealth accumulated in these temples. This explanation is supposed to rationalize their actions. In some other context they may even say the looting may be according to the laws of Shariat which again paints the events as legally sanctioned. [Sic: Churches in India own huge tracts of prime land. By this logic, it is perfectly legitimate to take this land and use it for other purposes! – NSR]

Dr. B.R. AmbedkarActually, Buddhism did not disappear from India after Ashoka. The truth was told by Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, a Buddhist himself. In the section, the decline and fall of Buddhism (Writings and Speeches volume III, Government of Maharashtra 1987 pp 229-38) he noted that after Muslim invaders destroyed the universities of Nalanda, Vikramasheela, Jagaddala, Odanthapura etc., followed by brutal killings of the Buddhist monks, forced the survivors to escape to Nepal, Tibet and other neighbouring countries to save their lives. As he wrote, “The roots of Buddhism were axed. Islam killed Buddhism by killing priestly class of Buddhism. This is the worst catastrophe suffered by Buddhism in India.”

Like the Devil quoting scripture, Marxists quote Ambedkar whenever it is convenient for them to denigrate Hinduism, but ignore his inconvenient words like “the decline of Buddhism in India is due to the terrifying actions of Muslims.” R.S. Sharma the author of NCERT text on Ancient India, New Delhi, 1992 p 112 writes, “Buddha viharas attracted Turkish invaders because of their wealth. They were the special greedy targets for the invaders. Turks killed many Buddhist monks. Despite these killings, many monks escaped to Nepal and Tibet.”

Who were these Turks? Hindus? Here the clever Marxist Sharma has hidden the fact that these ‘Turks’ were Muslims who destroyed these religious places as dictated by Sharia (Islamic Law). He tries to hide this fact by calling Muslims of Turkey with only the tribal name Turkish. At the same time they (he and others) write that Buddhism declined during Ashoka’s reign because of Brahmins who were deprived of their dakshina (monetary gifts). One should appreciate their sophistry — hiding the truth about Turks being Muslims, but creating the falsehood that Brahmins deprived of dakshina were responsible for the decline of Buddhism after Ashoka. Latin rhetoricians called such a tactic suppressio veri, suggestio falsi. – Folks Magazine, 20 May 2012

10 Responses

  1. sir i feel parthsarthy which bhyrappaji mentioned is diff one

  2. Is there a country in the world where history is distorted like this? How much role Hindus play in this distortion?

  3. This article just reinforces the fact the abysmal damage that these deplorable Leftist Historians have done to Indian political & cultural history & they continue to do so in collusion with the cartel nurturing evil intents.

  4. Truth needed to be exposed. And its being exposed none other than Shri N S Rajaram. I will keep all this what I read hear and will tell my kids about the truth … and truth about the history written by “real Marxist Historians”.

  5. TED talks are very good . Here Rajesh Rao describes Indus script as a linguistic code rather than just symbols as proposed by Witzel and others.

  6. http://richarddawkins.net/articles/575190-nalanda-and-the-pursuit-of-science
    Extract From Amartya Sens lecture to Indian Science Congress in Chennai, some yrs back

    Nalanda was violently destroyed in an Afghan attack, led by the ruthless conqueror, Bakhtiyar Khilji, in 1193, shortly after the beginning of Oxford University and shortly before the initiation of Cambridge. Nalanda university, an internationally renowned centre of higher education in India, which was established in the early fifth century, was ending its continuous existence of more than seven hundred years as Oxford and Cambridge were being founded, and even compared with the oldest European university, Bologna, Nalanda was more than six hundred years old, when Bologna was born.

    Yes , the Turk was Bakhtiyar Khilji, in 1193, Even the leftist , who has his own idea of justice has mentioned the name.

Comments are moderated

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: