Architects of the communal divide and the 2019 general elections – George Augustine


Anil Couto - Oswald Gracias

Dr Swamy's Tweet

George AugustineUntil the rise of Narendra Modi, Hindu culture was looked down upon, derided and made fun of by the Western imperial establishment with whom the erstwhile ruling elite in India colluded. … The fate of “pagan” India will be decided in the 2019 elections. Much will depend on how far Modi can hold together the unity that he has forged across religious and caste barriers and how much more he can inculcate a pride in the Hindu nation among ordinary countrymen regardless of their personal faiths. – George Augustine

Delhi Archbishop Anil Couto’s letter to Catholics dated May 8, 2019 (see below), to “pray for democracy” and exhorting his flock to defeat Hindu forces is a battle cry that Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his party should take to heart very closely. Archbishop Couto is a representative of the most undemocratic organisation in the world and the agent of an alien nation state, the Vatican, which has imperial designs in its operational manifesto. The Christian call for battle bodes ill for India’s democracy and for its majority Hindus.

The strategy of communal divide

For the ruling elite in any nation, democracy or not, keeping the majority in the grip of unrefined, primeval sentiments always pays well. If a sizeable group of people has grown beyond the basic earthly needs, showing carrots stops working and more is asked for. The easiest way is to create quarrels among themselves or with others. Divide people and it pays!

The “divide and rule” tactic the British imperialists experimented with by promoting political divisions between Hindus and Muslims in India is a case study in itself. The British adopted it as a legitimate strategy to govern India and when it was time to leave, divided the country into Muslim Pakistan and Hindu India as a parting shot, leaving behind the misery of millions who perished in the tragic consequences without shedding a tear. It ensured that the sub-continent could never remain in peace in the background of the then Cold War and the shadow of a collective Imperial West headed by the USA.

Wherever there is a  livid, non-healing laceration among humankind, like India-Pakistan, Israel-Palestine, Northern Ireland (where a tall wall keeps the peace), and so on, orchestrated divisions are the sores that fester. Where there is no religious divide, comes sectarianism like Sunni-Shia and Protestant-Catholic. Ethnic divisions also play a role like Kurds who want Kurdistan for themselves.

Global phenomenon

Communal or religious divides are nurtured in almost every country, and this accounts for most of the human conflicts taking place around the globe. Where communal divides were not possible (as in Palestine before 1948), the Imperial West imported Jews into the new Israel and made sure they were created.

Not many people know that the co-founder of geo-political strategy, H.J. Mackinder, had envisaged the Jewish settlers in Palestine around half a century before the imperialists implemented it. Mackinder would nod satisfactorily in his grave with the goings-on at the present-day White House, with Trump upping the ante for Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a spot Mackinder thought was the “navel” on the world map and very important to occupy to control the world.

So, communal divides are necessary all around, for the local leaders as well as for imperialists of all hues whose mortal eyes focus steadfastly on the planet’s resources and for the ultimate control of the world.

Religious divide in India

Distinguished from other countries, India is unique for its high population of Hindus, which phenomenon one cannot come across anywhere else (barring Nepal). There is some kind of contention among scholars and the intelligentsia about the status of Hindus as a religious group, for such is the variety of spiritual endeavour among them—ranging from brainy philosophies and staunch atheists up to the Semitic kind of no-evidence believers who faithfully enact blood sacrifices on a regular basis.

I prefer to call all the Hindus just pagans or heathens or infidels, because that is precisely what their self-proclaimed spiritual enemies such as the Christians and Muslims call them and who have been trying for more than 1500 years to annihilate them, prompted by their respective scriptural injunctions to get rid of them from the face of the earth, instigating their headless footmen by blessing this heinous act as a major religious duty. These scriptures are still deemed “holy” by faithful Christians and Muslims.

In the shadow of these primeval scriptural injunctions, the communal divide in India looks substantial, particularly when religious ideologies divide the human species on the basis of belief systems. Though the Hindus (pagans) amount to nearly 80 per cent of the country’s population, they are outnumbered by Muslims and Christians the world over. The dwindling population of Hindus in Pakistan and Bangladesh in recent times as well as the massacre of scores of Hindus in Myanmar by Rohingya Muslim terrorists in August 2017 (all Hindu countries some centuries ago) in their bid to change their pagan status, indicates that the dynamic scriptural forces of the Abrahamic religions still form a paramount factor in India as well.

Two hundred years of British education in India have made sure that the prejudice against the pagans and the “divide and rule” policy continued to flourish in India. The electoral divides between Hindu and Muslim were carefully nurtured by the Indian polity, since it fetched easy dividends for the ruling party. Add to it another kind of divide they deftly engineered within the Hindus, the so-called low castes and high castes, and the ruling Congress party continued to rule India for 60 years.

This political and social situation was aided and abetted by external forces, mostly through missionary enterprise, which controlled the health care and social welfare organisations, and sometimes funded by imperial spying agencies as in the North East of India. The control of the media and an education system that glorified the [Abrahamic] worldview demeaning the pagans and their worldview also reinforced this power structure, and most educated Hindus themselves were seemingly embarrassed to be pagans at all, so much so that many of these Hindus themselves joined their rivals and engaged heartily in periodic journalistic blitzkriegs around the world that regularly put to shame their own Hindu culture and civilisation before a Abrahamically inclined world audience.

Rise of Hindu nationalism 

A radical change in the political and social scene in India took place with the rise of Narendra Damodardas Modi to power under the banner of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), a party which came into being in 1980. Modi became successful only because he could unify people across communal lines. In Gujarat where Modi ruled for three terms as chief minister, a substantial number of Muslims regularly voted for his party despite the bloody riots that heralded his reign, which found them at the wrong end of the stick. The bloody riots followed the Godhra massacre where a criminal crowd killed more than 50 pagans, most of them women and kids. But the point to note is that Modi’s Gujarat has never seen a single Hindu-Muslim riot in more than one and half decades, a record none of the previous governments in Gujarat ever managed.

Until the rise of Narendra Modi, Hindu culture was looked down upon, derided and made fun of (like the Hindu rate of economic growth) by the Western imperial establishment with whom the erstwhile ruling elite in India colluded in and joined in the ridicule. The rise of Modi saw the rise of Hindu nationalism like never before. Young men and women, among them many Muslims and Christians, began to come out in public with pride in their eyes and fire in their hearts chanting “Bharat Mata Ki Jai”.

Many of these people from the minority religions identified with their ancestral culture, which was still the culture of the majority. The opposition had no answer to this unexpected pride of young people in the old pagan glory and they were shell-shocked. The opposition began to lose one election after the next, so that BJP now rules in over 20 states. However, the opposition is finding new bearings, starting to play new tricks at their old game of divide and divide. Their combined strength is still short of beating the BJP in most places in India, but they are garnering strength from external sources.

One of the mainstays of the opposition has always been the clergymen of Islam and Christianity who colluded with them against the majority pagans whenever they got an opportunity. The existence of nearly a billion Hindus in India today might look like a miracle for religious researchers who can rarely find old pagans anywhere else, but for the professional practitioners of Islam and Christianity, the rise of Hindu nationalism heralds not only a road block for their conversion enterprise, but also the thwarting of their religious mandate as commissioned by their scriptures. On top of it, they also have to answer their minders in places such as Saudi Arabia and the Vatican.

Vatican’s challenge

Delhi Archbishop Anil Couto’s battle cry should be taken as Vatican throwing down the gauntlet, considering the hierarchical discipline of its officials. Hindus have taken the challenge calmly in their characteristic fashion, but this should be taken as a serious warning from the international Christian establishment.

The fate of “pagan” India will be decided in the 2019 elections. Much will depend on how far Modi can hold together the unity that he had been steadily forging across religious and caste barriers and how much more he can inculcate a pride in the Hindu nation among ordinary countrymen regardless of their personal faiths. The motley crowd that have become the opposition is very dangerous indeed considering the media machinery at their disposal, backed by most of the big names in the West and the enormous funds at their disposal from external sources.

Though the guidelines for cow slaughter have been enshrined in the Indian Constitution and had not been brought in by Modi, we can expect more “beef controversies”, “murderous Hindu gangs” and “Hindu rapes” to make the headlines in The Washington PostThe New York Times and the likes. The faster Hindus accept that the 2019 general election is ultimately a showdown between pagans versus Abrahamics, who form the rest of the world, the quicker they will have a grip on the situation. – Vijayvaani, 27 May 2018

» George Augustine is an Indian author and translator who works in Germany.

Anil Couto's Letter

Couto's Prayer

Lingayat EvangelizationNB: The letter above attributed to the Secretary General of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India, Oswald Cardinal Gracias of Mumbai, has NOT been authenticated by this website.

 

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  1. Sterlite Protests

    Sterlite and the Tuticorin protests – Lalita Nijhawan – The Pioneer – New Delhi – Friday, 01 June 2018

    Brother Mohan C. Lazarus said, without any scientific backing, that Sterlite is a toxic factory. He said that the Church is praying to shut down the factory. He further stated that a protest will be held in Tuticorin, where all Catholics, Pentecostals, Church of South India (CSI) would unite to participate against Sterlite. – Lalita Nijhawan

    The coverage by the national media of the protests in Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu, against Vedanta’s copper smelting plant has been injudicious, based on hearsay and without application of mind. A narrative has been parroted without critical examination.

    It is true that protestors were killed in Tuticorin. But unfortunate and tragic as that is, did anyone bother to ask why police had to open fire? These protestors outnumbered the police force by a huge number at the collectorate; they assaulted police personnel physically, pelted them with stones, tore the clothes of female law enforcers and molested them, indulged in wanton acts of arson including setting fire to public property and indulged in an orgy of violence that threatened the safety of innocent people. Should it not be asked what forces were behind this extremely violent protest which is against every democratic norm? Was the protest sponsored or did it occur spontaneously? Who allowed the assault on police personnel and the burning of vehicles, buildings, ambulances and even setting the collectorate ablaze? Who made Tuticorin a battleground? Is death the only indicator of violence? Have we stopped condemning violence unless it results in deaths? Since when have we started celebrating protests indulge in acts of violence and destruction?

    It is the absence of these questions being asked that the Opposition, led by the Congress and Communists, were quick to blame without any basis whatsoever the Narendra Modi-led Central Government rather than lay the responsibility for both the protests and the deaths of protestors in police firing at the door of the Tamil Nadu State Government which is in charge of law and order. But facts are of no consequence for those Opposition leaders who took to make wild, defamatory charges against Modi calling him a “murderer”. But then that is par for the course for the conspirators who pushed the Tuticorin protests into violence as it helped them in their goal of slinging mud at the Modi regime. Another motive could well have been to ensure the closure of the Sterlite Copper Smelting plant. But has anyone rationally thought about the negative effects of closing the plant? Is anyone worried about how this will affect our country’s economy and the thousands of employees who will be laid off?

    The most provocative statement on the situation came from Congress chief Rahul Gandhi. Apropos of nothing in particular, he blamed the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) for the Tuticorin row, keeping in tune with his politics which begins and ends with RSS-baiting. When journalist Gauri Lankesh was murdered, Gandhi accused the Sangh of being behind the killing within half-an-hour of the shooting. When BS Yeddyurappa resigned as the Chief Minister of Karnataka because he couldn’t prove his majority on the floor of the House, Gandhi proclaimed he was supporting the rump JDS to “save the people from the RSS”. Rahul’s anti-Hindu bias is understandable but accusing the Sangh of being a terrorist organization is beyond the pale. In fact, the Congress-Communist cabal by baseless charges against the RSS instead of engaging in an ideological debate has ensured that the Sangh has come to represent Hindu sentiment nationwide. As a corollary, opposition to the RSS is considered ‘opposition to communalism’ and support of Islamic and Christian communalism and is termed ‘secularism’ by this cabal.

    In the Tuticorin case, however, there seems to be more to it than just the reflexive blame-the-Sangh approach; a concerted attempt by the Church in those parts, supported by Gandhi and the so-called secular media, to drag the Sangh into the row is evident. The districts of Tirunelveli, Tuticorin and Kanyakumari in Tamil Nadu have the highest number of Christians and the Church has great influence on the public. It is not a coincidence that in the last two decades these districts have faced the greatest opposition to national development projects.

    The Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project in Tirunelveli, which was developed in collaboration with Russia, also saw a lot of protests. America’s disdain for this project was quite evident. The then Prime Minister Manmohan Singh publicly blamed US-funded institutions for the protests against Kudankulam. The then Union Minister V Narayanasamy alleged that Bishop Yavon Ambrose of Tuticorin received Rs 54 crore and was the key figure behind the protests. Many Christian institutions such as People’s Education for Action and Liberation, and Good Vision were on the Union Home Ministry’s radar as instigators. The Home Secretary had announced that bank accounts of four such NGOs were sealed, as money was transferred from overseas to fund national protests and incite disruption.

    The Christian population in Tuticorin is close to 30 per cent and the Church has a deep impact on residents’ everyday life. The plan to expand the Sterlite copper plant was brought forward as a new addition to the scope of already on-going disputes. Before the Sterlite plant was closed, it was producing four lakh tons of copper annually. Under the proposed expansion, which would have happened if not for the violent protests and subsequent deaths in police firing, Sterlite would have produced eight lakh tons of copper annually. If this project had gone through, almost all of India’s copper needs would have been met domestically.

    According to official police reports, the Tuticorin protest has a clear foreign influence. Samarendra Das of the ‘Foil Vedanta Group’ flew in from London and secretly met Sterlite protesters and assured them that he would fully support the continuation of the protests, according to police. Is it a coincidence that after the Tuticorin violence John McDonnell, a prominent leader of the Opposition Labour Party in the UK, declared that Vedanta is a rogue company and demanded it be removed from the London Stock Exchange? The discussions regarding Sterlite were used to instigate the locals of Tuticorin. Brother Mohan C. Lazarus on a YouTube video said, without any scientific backing, that Sterlite is a toxic factory. He said that the Church is praying to shut down the factory. He further stated that a protest will be held on 24 March, 2018, at Rajaji Park in Tuticorin, where all Catholics, Pentecostals, Church of South India (CSI) would unite to participate against Sterlite. Scientists of the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) and the National Green Tribunal (NGT) had visited Sterlite and certified that emissions were within prescribed limits. Then what have these Churches achieved by provoking people against Sterlite, claiming that pollution levels are extremely hazardous? The Kundankulam protests saw the participation of Bishop Yvon Ambroise and SP Udayakumar, while the Sterlite protest had Brother Mohan C. Lazarus and other churches in the surrounding area as prime movers. Is the anti-development attitude of the Church not to be questioned? If the Manmohan Singh Government could take action against such disruptive elements then why can’t the Modi Government?

    Police were portrayed as villains in Tuticorin. The media narrative was overwhelmingly of trigger-happy cops going berserk; did anyone try to figure out why the police was compelled to take last-resort action? Local journalist N. Rajesh’s report says the Deputy Inspector General of Police Kapil Kumar Saratkar made elaborate arrangements at the protest venue so that activists would not reach the collectorate. Even when senior police officers were talking to protest leaders and asking them to ensure a peaceful demonstration, radical activists broke the barricades and used iron pieces from them to assault police personnel. Police responded with a ‘lathi’ charge. Rajesh’s report says he and some other journalists climbed to the rooftop of a hotel opposite the collectorate to get a better sense of what was going down. At 11:30 am some protesters, who had forced their way into the collectorate, began burning vehicles. When the protestors saw that their photographs were being clicked and videos being recorded, they pelted journalists with stones. When journalists came down from the roof of the hotel some were assaulted and many had their cameras snatched.

    The testimony of the collectorate employees supports Rajesh’s reportage. A female employee said that at 11.10 a.m., she was having tea in the canteen with her colleagues; about 20 minutes later they witnessed bruised and battered police personnel being chased by stone-pelting protesters. The employees were scared and didn’t know what to do, so they went back to their office for safety. Then there was a second wave of protestors when an estimated 15,000-20,000 activists entered the collectorate office. They had weapons fashioned from iron rods, glass bottles, petrol bombs and lathis. They set about destroying the office and setting fire to government vehicles. There were about 100 policemen deployed for security who tried to control the protestors and prevent them from entering the collectorate. But the protesters outnumbered the policemen by thousands. They ruthlessly attacked the policemen who ran away in fear of their lives. They then set fire to all collectorate vehicles. The entire office was filled with smoke, suffocating the employees. The protesters didn’t even spare female police personnel. They tore their clothes and molested them. There are hundreds of eye-witnesses to what transpired and they all say the same thing.

    Opportunistic politicians and parties who blame police for opening fire need to be more circumspect. Any loss of life is tragic and unfortunate, but what would they have done if faced with a life-threatening situation had they had been stationed at the Sterlite plant and tasked with ensuring its safety? Should violent mobs have been allowed to create havoc and decimate Tuticorin and the copper plant? Should physical assaults on cops and government officials have been allowed? Congress leader Ghulam Nabi Azad compared those who died in the police firing to the martyrs of Jallianwala Bagh. Azad should be asked if the martyrs of Jallianwala were armed with stones, iron rods, lathis, petrol bombs and glass bottles and whether they chased, assaulted and attempted to kill police officers and commit arson.

    The public may have a short memory but they cannot be fooled. Prior to Rahul Gandhi blaming the Sangh, and Ghulam Nabi’s comparison to Jallianwala Bagh, back in 2007 the UPA government led by Manmohan Singh had allowed the extension of the Sterlite plant. The Congress party’s blue-eyed boy and former Home and Finance Minister P. Chidambaram was a Director in Sterlite’s parent company Vedanta before becoming a minister in the UPA government. Blinded by his intense hatred for the Sangh, Rahul Gandhi has also forgotten that law and order is a state subject. There is no BJP government in Tamil Nadu, so why indirectly or directly accuse the RSS?

    It is about time that the BJP, the Central Government, and especially the Union Home Ministry learn from this incident. Asking for a report on the incident is not enough. The Home Ministry has failed to investigate the conspiracy, for which it needs to work in collaboration with State Government officials, to bring out the truth. During Manmohan Singh’s regime, there were some attempts to stop radical elements in the Church harming the national interest. What is stopping the Modi Government from following suit?

    (The writer is Director, Nijhawan Group of Companies)

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