The Chindu: Comrade Ram stabs editor Ravi in the back – T.S.V. Hari

Comrade Ram & Editor Ravi of 'The Chindu'[We] learnt to our shock that a major interview with A. Raja in defence of the telecom licensing policy published on May 22, 2010 — that was referred to by the Prime Minister in his press conference — involved a direct quid pro quo in the form of a full page, colour advertisement from the Telecom Ministry that was specially [published the] same day in The Hindu. – N. Ravi

For yet another time, yet another tussle in The Hindu family – has come to the fore.

Mr N. Ravi, editor of The Hindu, has leveled serious charges against his brother Mr N Ram. When a friend called Parthasarathy – who was one of the brightest reporters I had ever seen in action, had suggested that I joined The Hindu some thirty odd years ago, I had turned down the suggestion.

“I would prefer not being found dead in the offices of The Hindu. That is one newspaper where journalists have no individuality or individual freedom,” I remember telling Parthasarathy or Paachu as all colleagues lovingly call him.

* * *

There were and still are many journalists who continue to share this view. The sad, but bitter truth now is that Mr N. Ravi, one of the former editors of the paper too seems to be partly sharing this view. While I have no intention of withdrawing the above comment made over 30 years ago, I need to reiterate that I still respect The Hindu as a newspaper as I did then.

I have several reasons. I am listing three of them…

One of my earliest run-ins was with Mr Kasturi – in more ways than one – whom I used to refer as the benign dictator editor of The Hindu.

In the eighties, I was travelling to New Delhi by a flight from Chennai – as usual in the economy class. Mr Kasturi too was on that flight. Though he knew who I was and vice versa, we did not wish each other while boarding despite eye contact.

A few minutes after takeoff, an air hostess accosted me. “Are you Mr Hari?” I was surprised… and nodded in assent. “Mr Kasturi, in the business class … requests your presence, sir,” she said carefully. I was beside him in a jiffy.

“I know you are a rowdy journalist, Hari. In seat 1A – there is an obnoxious AIADMK MP called Thangaraj. The fellow is miserably drunk and is misbehaving with the cabin crew. None would dare challenging an MP in mid-flight, drunk or not, except a crazy man like you. I am asking you to control that nauseating fellow.” Mr Kasturi was not requesting me.

Before the flight landed in Hyderabad, I not only had Thangaraj under control but also had forced him to apologise to the cabin crew in that Indian Airlines flight. Needless to add, my language and manners with Thangaraj were brutally brusque and blunt. When the flight landed in New Delhi, I followed and buttonholed Mr Kasturi who had smiled approvingly at my very minor achievement in controlling the drunken MP.

“Sir, I have done what you asked me. But, Thangaraj is an MP. He may forget what happened now because of his intoxication. But, in case he remembers and moves some motion in parliament and tries to get me into trouble, I have to worry about my job in Amrita Bazar Patrika … which is a Congress-owned paper. The party is in alliance with the AIADMK.”

“So you are not loaded with mindless bravado after all,” Mr Kasturi said as we waited for our luggage to arrive. Obviously he did not expect any reaction to that. “You can be rest assured, young man, that this drunken fellow will not be able to do anything against you. Where will you be staying?” I told him the name of the hotel. Mr Kasturi did not even acknowledge having heard me right and walked away.

When I checked in, there was a message waiting for me. “Mr P. Kolandaivelu, [the then] special permanent representative of the Tamil Nadu government in New Delhi had called, sir. He has requested that you call him back once in the room,” the receptionist said. I complied.

In short, quick sentences, Mr Kolandaivelu went out of his way to be respectful and assured me that an appropriate complaint had been sent to the then Chief Minister Mr M.G. Ramachandran about the ‘horrible’ behaviour of Thangaraj. “That cur Thangaraj will not bother you at all. I will take care of it,” Mr Kolandaivelu added.

I am no Sherlock Holmes. But I knew who must have asked Mr Kolandaivelu to do that. I have never seen Mr Kasturi again. Someone said he had passed away. I had been shocked. I now know from his son Mr K. Venugopal – now very senior in The Hindu – another personal friend in the paper with whom I rubbed shoulders during my cub reporting days – that he is alive and well.

Mr Kasturi had headed the paper from 1965 to 1991. In more ways than one, it is still remembered as the Golden Era of The Hindu, Mr Kasturi’s ‘benign dictatorship’ notwithstanding. Mr Venugopal had come for the inauguration of the IANS office in Chennai despite my having invited him only through phone. I still am thankful for that.

I have known Mr N. Ram for over 30 years. In more ways than one, he was one of my earliest and perhaps is still the best contact in The Hindu. While I have no reason to disbelieve Mr N. Ravi who is opposing him on the basis of what he thinks is right, I would like to read Mr Ram’s defence whenever he goes public with it.

When I had been briefly contracted by Doordarshan and India Today to control the production of general election news at the end of the last century, Mr Ram had turned up at the Madras University within 10 minutes’ notice, at his cost despite his busy schedule, upon a mere telephonic request from me. In spite of the irritating single headphone that always forced one to hear echoes of one’s own speech impeding his reactions, Mr Ram looked pleasant while answering the meaningless questions of New Delhi’s north-centric anchors with incisive intelligence.

Later, a few years ago, as the Tamil Nadu Bureau Chief of IANS, I had the good fortune of signing the contract for The Hindu’s subscription for the agency’s output – something that had been attempted before my taking over for over a decade in vain. The negotiations conducted by me on behalf of IANS and those by all the main The Hindu family members including Ms. Malini Parthasarathy were mere formalities. Mr Venugopal and Mr Jayant – the latter an Associate Editor now and also a personal friend had obviously whispered their recommendations. The signing was done in a facile jiffy by none other than Mr Ravi from The Hindu’s side and by me on the other. That achievement had made entire Tamil Nadu sit up and take notice of a national news agency called IANS. That, of course, is water under the bridge.

To be fair, Mr Ravi, Mr Murali and Mr Ram so far, have indeed treated me like a prodigal son, despite my never having worked for the paper and in spite of my notoriety of being an unpredictable maverick since I began my innings in what had been Madras way back in 1979. Hence, I respect all the family members of The Hindu equally.

Mr Ram’s left leanings have always been well known. As a youngster, Mr Ram’s anger against the Cauvery Delta Region rice bowl noveau riche sadistic bosses in Keezhvenmani singed my conscience upon reading his account of the cold-blooded murders of poor landless farm labourers by electrocution simply because they had the courage to ask for “a little more” like modern day Oliver Twists.

So pronounced was Mr Ram’s affinity to communism that as a member of the party he is said to have once allowed the workers’ representatives to access confidential The Hindu management’s confidential MIS documents that could have adversely affected their negotiations while collective bargaining sessions with union leaders that were underway during a strike long before I became a journalist.

If those tidings are true, in my opinion, notwithstanding what Mr Ravi has written, those employed in The Hindu – journalists and others who sweat for The Hindu have an unenviable task of choosing their side, if ever. In more ways than one, in my opinion, since the freedom struggle, The Hindu till now has had a reasonably rightful claim to be termed India’s National Newspaper, as its masthead proclaims. But, if even 5% of the allegations made by Mr Ravi are true, one can only sigh in extreme sadness.

Many of us – Chennai based journalists – still prefer to refer to all The Hindu journalist shareholder siblings as respected colleagues. In my opinion, no journalist in his/her right mind would prefer to openly take any side in this imbroglio as non-shareholders have no locus standi in this issue.

At best, we can collectively appeal to all the siblings to sort the matters amicably – preferably beyond the precincts of courts – as Mr Ravi’s statement has made it evidently clear that the legal option can only prove to be counter-productive.

Excerpts from Mr Ravi’s letter to the employees of The Hindu dated April 20, 2011:

– In a shocking display of bad faith that has left me deeply anguished, N. Ram and some of the directors at the meeting of the Board on April 18, 2011 have sought to remove me and appoint as editor Siddharth Varadarajan who joined The Hindu in 2004.

– I joined the newspaper as a reporter in 1972.

– After 1991 when I took over as editor, our team transformed The Hindu from a Chennai-centred daily with just one page of local news to a well recognized national newspaper.

– We sought to uphold editorial integrity, seeking accountability from institutions and public officials without fear or favour.

– Between January 1991 and June 2003, the circulation of The Hindu increased from 4,52,918 copies (July-December 1990) to 9,33,458 copies (January-June 2003) or by 4,80,540 copies or 106.1%.

– In the more recent period, The Hindu has been losing market share, and from being level with the Hindustan Times, it has now fallen far behind that newspaper.

– Findings from the most recent market survey present a depressing picture of reader perception of unappealing content and a pronounced bias towards the left.

– It is a matter of public record that N. Ram, Editor-in-Chief, was to retire on May 4, 2010 on turning 65 and I was to take over as Editor-in-Chief under the arrangement agreed upon. However, in a shocking display of bad faith, Ram went on to renege on his commitment.

– Ram and a group of directors on the Board removed the powers and responsibilities of N. Murali, Managing Director in a vindictive move that was overturned by the Company Law Board, Chennai Bench that also came out with a severe indictment that their action was lacking in probity, good faith and fairness.

– Barely four months after the indictment, Ram and his group of directors have turned on me with the same lack of probity, good faith and fairness and have sought to remove me and impose a plan of editorial succession that is totally at variance with the longstanding directions of the Company Law Board.

– Under the specious plea of separating ownership from management, along with my removal as editor, Nirmala Lakshman is to be forced to “step down” as joint editor and Ma lini Parthasarathy as executive editor.

– Since 2003 … Ram as… Editor-in-Chief … [gave] unmerited coverage of certain political favourites … excessive coverage of the activities of the left and some of its leaders … for reasons that are bound to emerge sooner rather than later, turning the newspaper into an apologist for A. Raja through the 2G scam coverage… blacking out or downplaying any news that is less than complimentary to the Chinese Communist regime and indulges in an unceasing self-glorification campaign.

– Very recently, [we] learnt to our shock that a major interview with A. Raja in defence of the telecom licensing policy published on May 22, 2010—that was referred to by the Prime Minister in his press conference–involved a direct quid pro quo in the form of a full page, colour advertisement from the Telecom Ministry that was specially [published the] same day in The Hindu.

– I feel strongly that when a distorted picture has emerged based on selective leaks, information on the happenings cannot be restricted to the confines of the boardroom and all the journalists as stakeholders need to be taken into confidence.

N. Ravi

Post Script 1:

A brief history of The Hindu:

– The paper’s first issue appeared at the newsstands on September 20, 1878 as a weekly and became a daily in 1889.

– A group of six persons viz. G. Subramania Aiyer, M. Veeraraghavachariar [both school teachers] and four law students T.T. Rangachariar, P.V. Rangachariar, D. Kesava Rao Pantulu and N. Subba Rao Pantulu began the paper by borrowing one and three fourths of a British Rupee [it had sixteen annas of 12 paise each then – and therefore – with a capital of a mere 336 paise] to counter the British opposition to the appointment of T. Muthuswami Iyer to the Bench of the Madras High Court.

– In the paper’s first editorial, Aiyer wrote:

“[The] Press does not only give expression to public opinion, but also modifies and moulds it.”

– The British dubbed the owners – The Triplicane Six.

– The pro-British ‘intelligentsia’ derisively termed the paper ‘Mount-Road-Maha Vishnu’ to belittle its nationalistic outlook and its very name denoting the religion that should aptly be referred to as Sanaatana Dharma.

Post Script 2:

– The Indian Readership Survey [IRS] 2010 says that The Hindu is the third most-widely read English newspaper published in India. According to the IRS, the paper has some 21.59 lakh readers. The first is The Times of India. And the second is Hindustan Times.

Post Script 3:

– The British – to oppose whom The Hindu had been started – have left India.

– Thangaraj was an MP from Perambalur – the same constituency from where Raja was elected MP in 2009.

– While Thangaraj is into oblivion or dead, Raja is in prison in the 2G scam.

– Mr Kasturi is alive and said to be sprightly. May he live long!

– And ironically, The Hindu … is in the dock!

T.S.V. Hari is a senior journalist and former editor of Kamakoti. 

Advertisements

8 Responses

  1. And for the record, I stand by what I have said.

    I was treated in the most sordid manner in the Kamakoti office, the full details of which have not been recorded here.

    As the Kamakoti editor, you had an obligation to inform me of the circumstances and to stay away from the Kamakoti office. It was the very least you could have done.

    But you disappeared, if not to Mumbai then to some other place, and in complete innocence of the circumstances I walked into the Kamakoti office and even then your father refused to fill me in. I was kept waiting 2 hours if not 3 as your father stared daggers at me, and then I was told that you had gone to Mumbai. I only learned later from Rangarajan about the threat to Kamakoti when he published his news item which I then included in the book. See the reference at http://ishwarsharan.wordpress.com/parts-2-to-9/christians-threaten-to-bomb-kamakoti-magazine-hindu-voice-international/

    Your treatment of me as your source for a number of Kamakoti articles was utterly cowardly to say the least. But I learned a good lesson about newspaper editors that I have not forgotten.

    At the very least you owe me an unconditional apology. But instead you are always justifying yourself like a small boy.

    No you are never seeking publicity. But your recent articles are completely self-serving. You are the hero or you are the victim and martyr, but you are always there at the center of the story.

    As a senior journalist of vast experience and unquestioned integrity, why don’t you write something serious in the public interest instead of always complaining about how badly life has treated you.

    Namaskar

    • My dear Ishwar!

      I always have maintained that I owed you an uncondiitional apology for what happened after my forced departure from Kaamkoti office.

      If my memory serves me right, I had apologised to you in person and on phone.

      Now I am doing so in print.

      Please remember the following:

      1. I am not crying over anyone’s shoulder to rue my life’s misfortunes…and you know it. Nevertheless, if were you, I would be angry at the pedestrian treatment at the hands of anyone…whether it is me, my father or anyone.

      Lest you fault me again for becoming the hero in yet another of my writings…I will not record how here as to many times I have protested angrily against how many powerful persons over the slightest of slights…walked out of press conferences, defied improper authority, scoffed at sanctimonous humbugs and so on and got hurt in the process.

      I am sure, you have done all that and more and perhaps more effectively…

      2. I have always written what I felt were issues close to my heart and have always acknowledged my sources. I did so in your case too. In case I had failed to do so, I am acknowledging now…and also apologising for that gaffe.

      It did not matter to me then that as a result of publishing exposes on the wrongs suffered by Sanaatana Dharma, I ended up being chucked out of an empire penniless I helped create from virtually nothing for the sake of my own famly then headed by my father, who did not like my frankness one little bit…and you know that too. The woman and the two children born to me and her then..whose life I defended at a huge cost…now are estranged. And that does not matter either.

      For the record, the series in Kaamakoti was called KELVIKALAAL ORU VELVI SEIVOM or “Let us perform a holy sacrifice by asking questions!”.

      Ironically I was sacrificed within 3 months at the altar after beginning the endeavour.

      I will not name the several so-called militant Hindu organisations who used that and profited monetarily and politically from my exposes – quoting Voice of India sources.

      That the same outfits today are as shameless as those of other organised rowdy faiths…and perhaps you know that too.

      In more ways than one, possibily you suffered the same fate as me.

      Not only did I lose my job and became persona non grata to my father, but also another younger journalist who was my deputy – a bright young man called P Raghavan – whose talents were honed by me in Kaamakoti too had to leave.

      He now part owns a massive publishing empire…has more or less jettisoned my training for complete, impartial investigation, peddles pffile is bothered more about pelf and does not take my calls…

      I do not care.

      And among other things, my father kept harping on the point that I was endangering HIS EMPIRE by exposing the perfidy over the destruction of Hindu temples for making space for churches and mosques citing that as one of the reasons for his chucking me out.

      The fact was that there would have been no empire, no influence no nothing.. had I not created all of them though my contacts, contracts and networked funding in the first place!

      That too is water under the bridge, old hat and not worth the ink it is written with because that outrageous behaviour estranged me from you, whom I still consder a friend!

      And to me, the friendship is more important than any monetary gain. .

      3. And finally, I am only setting the record straight. Jjustifying myself will serve no purpose…because such attempts [even what i am doing now] will only antagonise people more as I am learning to my chagrin.

      Yes, I admit that I am indeed a small boy when compared to your age, experience and sacrifices.

      The times I have written stuff with me as one of the key players will not even cross 3% of the exposes I have done and continue to do in recent times and ever since I became a journalist way back in 1977..

      I criticize all those acts that singe my conscience and never write anything that my conscience does not permit me to.

      And despite my vitriolic language at times, I bear no ill-will towards anyone, any religion, group or even those whose oral blackballing, blackmailing and backstabbing persons who have all but destroyed some 56 years of my existence as a family man.

      I have no regrets on that count either.

      Yet, I once again, seek your pardon unconditionally for all my commissions and omissions..all of them inadvertent…and quote Saint Thiruvalluvar here – to my detriment – in its English rendering [my version] BURN INJURIES HEAL BUT NOT SCARS INFLICTED BY AN ACIDIC TONGUE.

      So, I zip my big mouth, continue seeking your blessings.and once again tender an unconditional apology.

      For me, the importance of your work and your fearless spirited defence of the Sanaatana Dharma is dearer than your overlook-able carping criticism.

      Vanakkam, namaskaaram!

      TSV Hari

  2. We cannot agree with Mr. Hari that The Hindu was a nationalistic newspaper prior to Indian independence. The paper was known as ‘The Sapper’ by freedom fighters because of its pro-British stance during the freedom movement.

    The name of the paper is a misnomer. The paper has always been anti-Hindu and pro-Muslim at least from the time we started reading it in 1977. The editorial policy has never been neutral and objective.

    During that period the paper was known as ‘The Old Widow of Mount Road’. It has since acquired the moniker ‘The Chindu’ because of Comrade Ram’s slavish praise of the Chinese system.

    The Hindu editors have always engaged in unethical journalistic practices. For example, the one time we had the misfortune of meeting Mr. Ram, he refused to identify himself as a journalist and editor of The Hindu and we did not know who we were talking to. Another time, when our book on the St. Thomas in India legend was sent for review, the book page editor C.V. Gopalakrishnan pretended he was only a correspondent of the paper and then asked a director of the newspaper, Nanditha Krishna, to produce a prominent pro-Thomas in India children’s article that totally ignored all the historical evidence against St. Thomas coming to India. Aside from Nanditha Krishna’s spiteful and deliberately misleading article, it is against all journalistic ethics for a newspaper director to publish in her own newspaper. See the full reference at http://ishwarsharan.wordpress.com/parts-2-to-9/hideaway-communalism-in-the-hindu-ishwar-sharan/

    Lastly, it can be said with some justification that the newspaper is boring and prone to outdated English-language usage.

    But then Marxism is boring and prone to outdated English-language thinking processes.

    Mr. Ravi should be thankful that he has been relieved of his duties in this dinosaur of a newspaper!

    • My dear Ishwar!

      Thank you for your illuminating, carping critique.

      Just three points of clarification.

      1. I said in my article that The Hindu till now had a reasonable claim to justify its being called India’s National Newspaper since the days of the Freedom Struggle. Nowhere have I said that The Hindu supported the freeom struggle…or…worse. The fact was the most of the original promoters sold off their shares even before the turn of the nineteenth century. I reiterate the “reasonable claim” part only on the basis of what other “national newspapers did and are continuing to do. The Hindu, in my opinion, is as much national as Kolkata’s Telegraph, TOI,, HT – or the different versions of other mass-published-multiple-edition papers.Your experiences with The Hindu were bad. But, kindly remember that I refused to join the paper – by saying that I would not prefer to be found dead in it…and it is there in cold print. So I am not being an apologist of The Hindu at all…if that is what you are calling me.

      2. All newspaper editors [with the rare exceptions like poor old me when I was editor of Kaamakoti] generally hide behind various masks – “editorial policy”, “nationalistic outlook”, “libel possibilities”, blah, blah. Whenever someone threatens with violence or legal action, such persons run scared and publish retractions or blatantly change their line. In my case, I am proudly reminding you, they changed the editor…who refused to change…despite the gravest provocations and threats from certain organisations. You yourself pointed out in Hamsa.org that the Kamakoti offices were threatened. Yes they were. Since I refused to budge,

      • My connection got cut off.

        I am continuing my second point.

        That such a change was effected by the publisher who also happened to be my own father, is beside the point. And being in the eldest in my family – my siblings did to me what perhaps Ram, in Ravi’s view, is doing to the rest. Yes, if Mr Ravi is right, there is a parallel.

        3. And finally it does not matter at all about criticism to me…because I write and cotinue life with a clear conscience. Just as my friendship with you and respect towards your fiery brand of writing is above all coniderations so are my honesty, integrity and unbending nature. And I am sure you know that too.

        Therefore, yes, this was a good banter and I enjoyed writing this immensely.

        Vanakkam,

        TSV Hari

        • My dear Hari,

          I have told my experience with this newspaper as you have told yours. I do not regard this as carping.

          You have stated in PS-3 “The British – to oppose whom The Hindu had been started – have left India.”(emphasis mine).

          This does imply that the paper supported the freedom struggle against the British and was therefore nationalistic.

          It does not seem logical to me to call a pro-British (at that time), anti-national newspaper a “national newspaper”. It is a contradiction in terms–isn’t it?

          As for the threats to the Kamakoti offices, you did indeed budge. You ran away to Mumbai and left me holding the bag without informing me what was in the bag. Hardly a heroic or ethical deed (more carping here I’m afraid) especially when I was left to deal with your father without knowing the rules of the game he played.

          So you are really not any different from all our other brave editors and journalists who are, of course, heroes in their own eyes if not in the eyes of their readers.

          Namaskar,

          Ishwar Sharan

          • I am sorry, Ishwar, I am contradicting you again.

            I did not run away to Mumbai or anywhere.

            I was very much in Chennai…but sacked from the paper – by its publisher – from my job as the editor.

            And I did not run away at all.

            I was very much in Chennai for quite sometime and had to go to Mumbai…to feed myself.

            I did not leave anything for you to hold.

            An editor of a newspaper – is an employee.

            That my father never paid me is one thing. But he exercised his right as a publisher to sack me.

            Later, thanks to poisoning by the woman who soon shall be my ex-wife – I was almost dead.

            It is my sheer determination, the Grace of God and blessings of good souls like you that I am still alive, well and somewhat kicking.

            As far as The Hindu is concerned, please read what I wrote again, carefully.

            I said [thanks for your emphasis] “was started to oppose…the British.”

            I still stand by what I said.

            I do not dispute the fact that The Hindu very often supported the British…during the freedom struggle.

            But then, so did most of the papers including the then Bennet and Coleman owned Times of India, the British owned Statesman…and the Birla owned version of Hindustan Times.

            Yet, even for a moment, I never doubt the good intentions of Ghansham Das Birla’s patriotism .

            Birlaji made his billions long before the British left.

            And Gandhiji was shot ded at his place in New Delhi.

            Yet, I do not doubt the patriotism of Birlaji.

            The Hindu is something totally different.

            In my article, I said I would never work for The Hindu.

            I did not work for them as an employee ever.

            When the entire so-called champions of Hinduism were scared stiff of the superintendent of police called Prem Kumar, I was the only one who openly challenged him and worse, did not seek any publicity.

            A so called champion Hindu journalist who had lived abroad sent me a legal notice…after writing abroad in support of the Acharyas…Even today, I have not exposed him…only because…by doing so, I shall be doing a disservice to Sanaatana Dharma.

            You have every reason to be peeved about The Hindu…and I support you on that…whether you want it or not.

            And whether you are in agreement with what I write or not, my admiration for your forthright views shall forever remain unaltered.

            Once again, I am only setting the record straight and am not casting any aspersions on you or making any insinuating statements.

            I rather welcome the fact that you got angry with me.

            Anger is the truest sign of truthfulness and faithful, selflessness.

            Vanakkam,

            Salutations!

            TSV Hari.

            • And for the record, I stand by what I have said.

              I was treated in the most sordid manner in the Kamakoti office, the full details of which have not been recorded here.

              As the Kamakoti editor, you had an obligation to inform me of the circumstances and to stay away from the Kamakoti office. It was the very least you could have done.

              But you disappeared, if not to Mumbai then to some other place, and in complete innocence of the circumstances I walked into the Kamakoti office and even then your father refused to fill me in. I was kept waiting 2 or 3 hours as your father stared daggers at me, and then some flunky came in and told me that you had gone to Mumbai and were not available.

              Your treatment of me as your source for a number of Kamakoti articles, in a circumstance that was highly dangerous to me, was utterly cowardly to say the least. But I learned a good lesson about newspaper editors that I have not forgotten till today. They will always save their own skin at the cost of their correspondents.

              At the very least you owe me an unconditional apology. But instead you are justifying yourself like a small boy.

              No you are never seeking publicity. But your articles are completely self-serving. You are the hero or you are the victim and martyr, but you are always there at the center of the story.

              As a senior journalist of vast experience and unquestioned integrity, why don’t you write something serious in the public interest instead of always complaining about how badly life has treated you.

              Namaskar

              Ishwar Sharan

Comments are moderated

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: